Interview with Leo Lillard
QUESTION 17
INTERVIEWER:

DESCRIBE—YOU'RE THERE, IT'S, IT'S, YOU'RE TWENTY YEARS OLD AT THAT TIME, YOU'RE THERE AT THE MARCH IN YOUR BEST RECOLLECTION, DESCRIBE THAT DAY, DESCRIBE THE MARCH, DESCRIBE THE FEELING, DESCRIBE WHAT YOU, WHAT YOU EXPERIENCED THAT DAY.

Leo Lillard:

First of all, it was a, it was a golden, crisp day, it was a beautiful day in the spring. Just a kind of ideal day for a student you know, to do anything other than go to class, but besides that it was the kind of day where, where we felt that the found—a major blow had been dealt for our cause. We knew at this point with the numbers for the first time, we had numbers, we had a spectrum, we knew that, that once the Mayor came out of his little hiding place he had nowhere to run. He had to come out and face, face the music, so to speak. And we knew that once we left there, Nashville would never be the same. Uh, in terms of the fact that that here for the first time we have a major body of black folks and white folks saying: Come out and face the music, come out and, and deal with the fact that we are not going away, the movement is not going away, things have got to change or we'll probably come back everyday.