Interview with Robert Links
QUESTION 14
JACKIE SHEARER:

OK, cut.



ROBERT LINKS:

You know when we were working on the Bakke case, I had a lot of friends who disagreed with me about having a color blind Constitution and they'd say, "What's so wrong about having this program? We're just going to do it for a couple of years. Let's take care of business and then get on with it." And I think the thing that bothered me the most about that is anybody who thinks these programs are going to be in place for five years, or ten years, or 15 or 20 years is dreaming. It isn't going to happen that way because we are going to raise up a generation of Americans who will have ingrained in their psyches the proposition that legal rights and the benefits and reward of society should be apportioned because of race. That is a very dangerous idea. And if I can continue, I think the real danger in the idea is when you start dealing with groups that "overqualify". You take a group of Jews who perhaps are in medical schools way beyond their numbers in the national, local, state population. And you start saying, "You know, we don't have anything against Jews but they're taking up too many places and we've got to hold them back just a little bit so we can let these other people in." And I think anybody who thinks back to the 1920s when there were the quotas keeping Jews out of Harvard Law School doesn't need much of a re- of a refresher course to know what's wrong with that. And that's the problem we're dealing with now and that we will be dealing with for a generation to come.

JACKIE SHEARER:

OK, cut.