Interview with Marian Logan
QUESTION 9
PAUL STECKLER:

I want to go back to the Poor People's Campaign--

MARIAN LOGAN:

Uhum.

PAUL STECKLER:

Specifically starting again when I first heard, because I know that you had qualms about the tenor of the times and the possible effect on Dr. King.

MARIAN LOGAN:

Yes.

PAUL STECKLER:

So, let me start the question again. How did you feel about the Poor People's Campaign and why?

MARIAN LOGAN:

When I first heard about it, I was really very apprehensive. I thought that as it began to develop, or as I heard about how it was developing, it was becoming much too big and unwieldy for us to be able to handle. And, ah, also considering the tenor of the times, I wasn't sure that it could be a success. I wasn't sure that Congress, and the powers that be in Washington D.C., would be welcoming because it wasn't like '63 which was such a glorious march and glorious day, you know. This bringing of poor people to the seat of government was like, you know, throwing it in their faces, and I don't think too many of the officialdom of Washington was gonna take that with any great grace. So I had many reservations about it, and after thinking about it for a long time, and speaking to my husband about it, and other friends. I've devised this memo, and, ah, I sent it to Martin. And at the same time, I sent copies to every member of the board of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, because Martin had a way of getting my letters, and messages, and memos, and things, and we would laugh and talk about, but he would never tell anybody else, you know. And, ah, I felt this was something that was very important, that the board as a whole should know about it. And, ah, Martin was very unhappy with me about that.

PAUL STECKLER:

And then the last week before he died.

MARIAN LOGAN:

Yes.

PAUL STECKLER:

And then you had a long evening with you and your husband and Dr. King--

MARIAN LOGAN:

Right.