Interview with Marian Logan
QUESTION 2
PAUL STECKLER:

It's early 1967 and--

MARIAN LOGAN:

Yes.

PAUL STECKLER:

and Dr. King is about to take a stand, that, that a lot of people are going to have a lot of things to say about his stance on the Vietnam War.

MARIAN LOGAN:

Very unpopular. Among many of our friends, and I guess, I dare say, all of the other leaders of the, what we call the Big Six. You know, they were very against it, as a matter of fact, frankly at the beginning so was I. And, ah, I'm not so sure Dr. Logan was, ah, really against it. He was more of a thinker, and he was trying to figure just from where Martin was coming, you know. But we had meetings here at the house, where, ah, Whitney and Roy and Bayard, and Dorothy Height, and Martin. I'm trying to think whom else, I've left out somebody. But anyway, the Six would get around, and everyone as I remember was against it, except Martin. But Martin tried to explain, he really was dedicated to his feeling of the moral- morality or the lack of morality in the Vietnam War. And, ah, the same way he was committed to real, true, non-violence. And, ah, sometimes that interfered with the, the thinking or the machinations of others, you know who, had their own agendas, or different agendas, maybe even- Martin, Martin was very rigid about his, ah, non-violence and, ah, when he finally got around to the Vietnam War he was really, you know, really bent on it. You could not move him. And as has turned out, years later, I've often wondered what Martin would say now.