Interview with Marian Logan
QUESTION 7
PAUL STECKLER:

So when you first heard about Dr. King's first coming out against the war in Vietnam, how did you feel?

MARIAN LOGAN:

Well I was shocked, I was surprised.

PAUL STECKLER:

Can you start with "when I first heard,"

MARIAN LOGAN:

Ah. When I first heard about Dr. King coming out against the war in Vietnam, I was really surprised and I wasn't sure that I was really in agreement with him in the beginning. Although, I came to understand his position, which that of a moral commitment he had, and the feeling that it was unjust. I think he had discovered long before we did that there were many more Black soldiers in Vietnam fighting and dying: he was just against the war. He was just against the war. It wasn't a thing he had to do, it wasn't a political thing--I think as it turned out, it was kind of like a death knell for him--it was a very brave thing for him to do because he went against all the people who we considered reasonable** people--not just the President and all those in the Democratic Party, but all the leadership of the Black community, and others--our Jewish friends who wouldn't be brave enough to come out and say- I think it was a very brave act for Martin, and I'm proud of him for that.