Interview with Marian Logan
QUESTION 8
PAUL STECKLER:

Later in 1967, into the summer and in the fall--

MARIAN LOGAN:

Hmm.

PAUL STECKLER:

--ah, Martin King came up with a new idea. The new idea of Poor People's Campaign.

MARIAN LOGAN:

Right.

PAUL STECKLER:

And, what were your reactions, when you first heard it, why and why?

MARIAN LOGAN:

Uhum. Well, when I first heard it I thought, I don't know about that, I couldn't envision what it was gonna be. I didn't note potential or anything. But the more I heard about it, and the more I thought about it. The more I felt that it was not wise. I was afraid what would happen, going to Washington, Martin's ideas. You know, it grew, kind of like top seed, to the point where he just said, "Everybody y'all come." And as it turned out, people left their homes, they left everything and just came to Washington. Riding on buses those who could, some walked. People came all kinds of ways, but left everything. They came because they believed something really was gonna happen, and the government was going to take care of them. And I began to feel that, ah, we had bitten off a lot more, than we were gonna be able to chew. So I talked to Martin about it, we had our disagreements. Then I sat down, I guess over a period of a couple of weeks or so, I thought about it and I wrote a memo.

PAUL STECKLER:


MARIAN LOGAN:

Yea.