Interview with Robert Lucas
QUESTION 21
JUDY RICHARDSON:

Can you give me a sense of the Cicero march, particularly the story you told me about, like the mitts so that they could catch the bricks in terms of self defense. What happened? Just get comfortable for a second. That's fine, OK, and you can smile .

ROBERT LUCAS:

When CORE first decided to march in Cicero the thinking was part of some of the Freedom Movement leadership that the march was not going to be a success. As a matter of fact that it was going to fail because we simply couldn't muster enough people, you know, for it to make any kind of a difference but, ah, see they, they were really surprised because there were a lot of people in Chicago, a lot of people in the militant wing of the movement that had really disagreed with SCLC to some extent and that was really their opportunity to get back at SCLC, I mean, in, in the moderates, if you will. So, because of that, ah, we were able to get about 300 people to, ah, to march into Cicero. It took place September 4, 1966 and, ah, as we marched into the city the number of the young people I noticed, ah, had, ah, baseball gloves, as we started.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Sorry, could you say young Black people, so that--

ROBERT LUCAS:

Right. As, as we begin to march into Cicero I noticed a number of young Black people there, baseball gloves. And I wondered, you know, really why they had the gloves. But after we got, you know, once inside of Cicero I was able to see that the young Blacks were, were really catching the, the missiles that the White toughs were throwing at them and, and really returning, you know, those missiles and what have you and that's what's really prompted the Chicago Tribune to do a headline the following day to label the march as a march that returned bricks.