Interview with Robert Lucas
QUESTION 27
JUDY RICHARDSON:

Why was the Cicero march a high point for you?

ROBERT LUCAS:

Ah, the Cicero point, march was ah.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

I'm sorry, start over again, ok.

ROBERT LUCAS:

The Cicero march was a high point to me for a couple of reasons. One, one was, because a, a young, ah, Black, ah, ah, had graduated from high school and been naive about, ah, the racial hatred in Cicero, went into Cicero and, ah, got his brains beaten out by some young White boys with, ah, a baseball bat. It was also a high point to me because some--

JUDY RICHARDSON:

I'm sorry, cut just a second, ah--



JUDY RICHARDSON:

Why was the Cicero march, what had happened during.

ROBERT LUCAS:

The, the Cicero.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Oops, cut please--



JUDY RICHARDSON:

Give me a sense of why the Cicero march was important. What had happened earlier that summer?

ROBERT LUCAS:

The Cicero march was important for a couple of reasons. One, when we marched into Cicero we were really commemorating the death of a young Black that had naively gone into Cicero earlier that summer and, ah, gotten his brains beat out, ah, ah, with a baseball bats, ah, by some young White toughs. And it was also important to me because, ah, of the fact that say Dr. King and SCLC, Freedom Movement, had refused to go to Cicero. So, therefore a lot of people inside of Cicero, ah, thought that we were afraid to come. And because of that, Blacks that worked in Cicero had been working there for years, were literally dragged from their cars and, and beaten up. And, it's my understanding after the march, you know, that didn't occur any more. If it did it was really greatly reduced.