Interview with Robert Lucas
QUESTION 4
JUDY RICHARDSON:

SCLC had thought about using the, ah Chicago movement as a kind experiment in terms of whether non-violence would work in the North. How did you feel about that?

ROBERT LUCAS:

Oh, well I didn't, I didn't know that they had plan to use Chicago as an experiment. Our thoughts were that somehow with the SCLC and Dr. King coming here that, ah, there were going to be, you know, something, not instant freedom but at, but at least some point in time. In five or six months, you know, there would be, you know, ah, ah, a great deal of freedom. And if they, if they had thought of using us as some sort of laboratory to test non violence in, in the North, ah, I can't say whether they were very, very successful in that, ah, because, ah, I really don't think that, ah, SCLC in 1966, you know, ah, carried out its, its program out to the fullest.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Excuse me, Cut please, yeah, that's good, we just need to--



JUDY RICHARDSON:

SCLC was using Chicago as an experiment for the test of non-violence in the North. How did you feel about that?

ROBERT LUCAS:

Well, that's, that's the first I've heard that, you know, that, that they thought that. Ah.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

I'm sorry if you could just begin with something that includes using "the experiment."

ROBERT LUCAS:

Well, the, the fact that, ah, ah, the thinking, SCLC's thinking was that they would Chicago as some sort of an experiment in terms of whether non violence would work in, in, in the North in that I was not really aware of that. Ah, we were so caught up with the fact that somehow SCLC was going to bring some sort of, not exactly instant freedom, but at least bring some freedom to Chicago maybe within a year or less that we never really, really, it never really occurred to us really what kind of hidden agenda that they had if you will.