Interview with Adrienne Manns-Israel
QUESTION 18
JUDY RICHARDSON:

So what was it like, now, you're going back in, you've decided that you have to end the take-over, what is your feeling at this point.

ADRIENNE MANNS-ISRAEL:

I felt, I felt let down--

JUDY RICHARDSON:

I'm sorry if you could say--

ADRIENNE MANNS-ISRAEL:

At the end of the takeover, I felt left down because--

JUDY RICHARDSON:

Excuse me.

JUDY RICHARDSON:

If you could say--

ADRIENNE MANNS-ISRAEL:

At the end of the take over I felt a let down--

JUDY RICHARDSON:

I'm sorry just wait till I finish, OK.

ADRIENNE MANNS-ISRAEL:

At the end of the takeover I felt let down because, first of all our unity had been broken. How ill, ill, ill-will surfaced, conflicts surfaced. People began to accuse others of selling out. The students, I think some of them, felt we had sold them out because we wouldn't stay on and on about this one point. And I told them that, the police and the army, the 81st, 82nd Airborne, whomever were coming out of the Pentagon and people that we had stationed downtown had called us and said that they're bringing up the army and the police are on 14th street or George Avenue, or whatever. See we're in this building, they can't see what's going on out there, and they've surrounded the area. And when they, you know, when, when the cameramen and all this pull out they're going to come and take the building. I knew to me that those students were not prepared to, to die. They were saying they were prepared, but they weren't, I didn't believe it. And I said, "Well, if you all are prepared to stay here and die," I remember I said, "I'll stay and, and die," but in my heart I really, type of person I was, I couldn't lie about something like that. I said, "OK, I'll stay here and die, I don't think we ought to but I'll do it." And the rest of them were saying, "Well we're saying this but we don't really think they're going to come," and so at that point, I felt, oh, I felt um, that maybe I had gone a little too far, maybe I had pushed things further than people really should have gone, because they, they really didn't understand. And they went out with this "We're a Winner" music, The Impressions. I didn't feel that way about it at all, I felt to win something you, you, you needed to have a sense about what you had done and what you had not done and we had not done two thirds of what we had said we were going to do, because the consciousness of the students, to me, had not been raised significantly from where they were when they came in to where they were when they left.