Interview with Burke Marshall
QUESTION 23
INTERVIEWER:

IT WASN'T A QUESTION OF THE AGENTS IN PLACE BEING THEMSLEVES SOUTHERNERS AND THEREFORE MAKING PERSONAL DECISIONS?

Burke Marshall:

The fact that the agents themselves were southerners might have increased the problem, but it didn't create the problem. In my, in my judgment, even if you'd had, even if it had been a total transfer so that only agents from Minnesota were in Georgia and only agents from Georgia were in Minnesota, I think the basic Bureau behavior would have, would have been the same. Now when, when the bureau finally took on as a matter of public commitment and public responsibility dealing with Klan violence in Mississippi and brought down a whole wad of new agents, some of them southern, but they knew what their job was and their job was to break the Klan and so they treat the Klan like they treated the Communist Party. They infiltrated it, they bribed Klan members, they eavesdropped, they poked around they, put out false rumors, they obfuscated things, and confused things and they got the Klan in such an uproar that it was able to, it just ceased to act effectively after…

FILM PRODUCTION TEAM:

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