Interview with Burke Marshall
QUESTION 28
INTERVIEWER:

YOU THINK THAT WAS THE MOTIVATION FOR JOHN KENNEDY'S LONG NEGOTIATIONS WITH GOVERNOR BARNETT? OR HOW MUCH ALSO WAS THE QUESTION OF POLITICS PLAYING?

Burke Marshall:

The, the, what I've been talking about in terms of federalism of course is politics. It, it, it is the politics of consensus. The politics of trying to make a permanent change that is very, very unpleasant to a large number of people who are in power, and by that, the large number of people that were in power I mean the white people of the south or at least the parts of the south represented by the state of Mississippi. So that's a political matter, it's a matter of political leadership to try to make that work. Of course the president's gonna win in the end.** He's got the whole armed forces of the United States. He can call in the Air Force; he can bring Navy ships up the Mississippi; he can call out the army as he did; he can drop parachuters in. I suppose he could shoot missiles at Oxford Mississippi, so he's gonna win at the end. But the political matter is politics in a deep sense of political leadership so that the change that is gonna come about, it- the change that is recognized and accepted and is not looked upon as having been imposed by force.