Interview with Burke Marshall
QUESTION 31
INTERVIEWER:

DID YOU EVER TALK ABOUT THE PRECEDENTS IN THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT IN WASHINGTON, LITTLE ROCK, GEORGIAI EVEN THE BROWN CASES? THE LUCY CASE, HAVE YOU EVER TALKED ABOUT THAT?

Burke Marshall:

Yes, yes, we thought that the uh, I thought, I can speak for myself that them, um Lucy case was a failure of federal responsibility because it didn't stick. She was in the end driven off the campus by violence, and that's unacceptable when she has a constitutional right and a right based on a specific court order to go to the University. As far as Little Rock is concerned, we thought, I thought, I think the President thought that President Eisenhower had been indecisive and ambiguous with Governor Faubus at first and then maybe had done too much secondly by sending in a large force than in context of Arkansas, which was really prepared to accept integration in the central high school, it wasn't the people of Arkansas, or the people of Little Rock, it was the governor that was the problem there. And so that, that massive use of troops in Little Rock I thought in retrospect was unnecessary. That was why we tried marshals and used marshals successfully as you know during the Freedom Rides. Marshals weren't enough at Oxford as, as, as it, as it turned out.

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

CAMERA ROLL 157, SOUND ROLL 1130.

Burke Marshall:

The President was exhilarated by the March on Washington. He watched it on television. He met with the leaders after it was over, thought the- Martin King's speech was magnificent. I heard him say he thought it was one of the best speeches he ever heard. So it was — it was a great, great moment for him and he thought, very, very helpful politically because the country saw blacks and whites acting together in a political movement that everybody would respect and like.

CAMERA CREW MEMBER:

CAMERA ROLL 158.