Interview with Ed Marciniak
QUESTION 15
SHEILA C. BERNARD:

The next day rioting breaks out in the street, and Mayor Daley blamed it on the movement. Can you talk about why or what would lead them to connect the two of them? The rally and the rioting?

ED MARCINIAK:

I don't know the forum in which the mayor, or the way in which the mayor ble- ah, blamed the freedom movement, but I think--

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

Cut, it's a siren.



ED MARCINIAK:

What most people don't realize--

ED MARCINIAK:

What most people don't realize was the impression that that march created over the television stations. It looked disorderly. It looked disorganized. It looked like people were taking over the streets of Chicago. That was the impression. My feeling was that that image was disconcerting to me because I don't know how people out in the communities would take it, whether the youngsters wouldn't see in it a license to repeat what they thought they saw over those, ah, television channels. Ah. The mayor didn't see this except on television. I saw it first hand and I saw it later on the ten o'clock news. Ah, and to the, uh--Secondly, The mayor did feel that there was no need for outsiders, ah, to stir up the troops in Chicago. And therefore I think his natural inclination was to say, "Well we have never had these things before. Now they're happening. What's the explanation?" It must be these events and these people and the way they're doing things, ah, that was responsible, that, them, was responsible for the rioting that took place**.

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

Cut.