Interview with Ed Marciniak
QUESTION 16
SHEILA C. BERNARD:

Can you tell me, sort of start spend a couple months looking for a confrontation and they finally get it in the Marquette Park? Can you describe watching that process take place and realizing that this would be the confrontation?

ED MARCINIAK:

What we found it difficult to do was to k- arrive at some sort of an understanding or an agreement. Our objective was to find some way to give the freedom movement, Ma Luthin King[SIC] a victory that he could take home. Ah, we w- weren't able to find it. Ah, they couldn't find a dramatic elements for, or create the dramatic elements for th- this kind of confrontation. Ah, when, when they announced, ah, the marches we had a clear si- c- city policy at the time which was that, ah, ah, any- if a Black family moved in an all-White neighborhood, if it took a thousand police to protect that White family's rights to move in that neighborhood we'd have a thousand police on them.

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

Try that again--

ED MARCINIAK:

The city, well, if, it, the city's policy with regard to fair housing was that if a Black family moved in to an all-White neighborhood, it was the police's job to protect that family's right to move into that home. And if it took a thousand police to do it we, we had a thousand police out there. And superintendent Orlando Wilson at the time understood that policy, ah, and then carried it out. And it was our staff who did the community relations work whenever that occurred. There, there were only one or two cases where we had to have that many police out. Maybe a couple of hundred. And if you talk about two or three day shifts, it was a thousand police. But that was an important part of the fair housing policy. It was one thing to say you can't discriminate against a person because of his or her race in the purchase or sale of a home. It's another thing to protect your right if you do move in.