Interview with Rhody McCoy
QUESTION 31
LOUIS MASSIAH:

How did it feel that day working across the Brooklyn Bridge with all those people?

RHODY McCOY:

Well I think I had about two or three emotions at the same time. The first one was probably the proudest moment in my life, that that many people felt, one, that I had done a job or was doing a job and two, were committed to the education of the Black student. It was something. And they were, they had a song they were chanting. I don't remember all of the words but it was a support song. Secondly, ah, we had been told that, ah, there were FBI agents in the crowd and so we began to have some other kinds of apprehensions. C, Not FBI but CIA agents in the crowd and they were going to arrest a few people or do some things to people. And so I had that kind of fear. And then, finally I had the, I guess the happy feeling. Ah, if you look at that picture. There are a lot of students there, a lot of students, boy.

LOUIS MASSIAH:

Once again and just say, walking across the Brooklyn Bridge, or, you know, that. Just, once again.

RHODY McCOY:

Walking across the Brooklyn Bridge was, in my judgment, the greatest moment in my life. That I was amongst the people who felt I was doing a good job and supported it and who were committed to the education of Black kids. And secondly that the, there were just so many youngsters there. I mean a lot of youngsters, cheering and orderly and in support of, of the program and the project and their parents. And then of course we were kind of apprehensive and had some fear because we heard that there were going to be some trouble. There were agents, CIA agents, or whatever they were in there were going to create some problems. And we were sort of, of nude. Because the police refused to escort us across the bridge.

LOUIS MASSIAH:

Stop.