Interview with Floyd McKissick
QUESTION 11
JAMES A. DeVINNEY:

Now there was some violence along the way and you didn't have the federal government there to protect you as they had been on the Selma march for instance. Weren't you worried about your family?

FLOYD MCKISSICK:

Well you always worry about your family. But yet, ah, these were the days, ah, when I think, ah, you love your family and you know that, ah, it's possible something is going to happen and things did happen on the march, many of which were recorded, many of which were not recorded. Ah, but, ah, you, ah, you have to take a positive look on it. I didn't want my kids to ever go back and say they did not participate in something. They asked to participate and I felt it would be wrong if I were down here marching in the street to tell them that they could not march and if my wife was coming along, I certainly knew that she was, ah, well experienced and she would keep them pretty much in hand. So, that did not pose too much of, of a question. We were, in other words, we had had that kind of experience in North Carolina.