Interview with Rev. Orloff Miller
QUESTION 1
INTERVIEWER:

. . .UM, AND CERTAIN EVENTS THAT KIND OF HELP—AND YOU'RE, YOU'RE UM, GOING INTO MISSISSIPPI TO OBSERVE THE COFO EFFORTS. I'D LIKE FOR YOU TO TALK TO ME ABOUT THAT AND TALK TO ME ABOUT HOW THEY'RE BEGINNING TO FORM AND, UH, A CARING AND A DESIRE TO BE A PART OF WHAT WAS GOING ON IN THE SOUTH AT THAT TIME. TELL ME A LITTLE BIT ABOUT YOU.

Rev. Orloff Miller:

Ok, we're rolling is that what you're saying? Well I guess my first involvement in the Civil Rights Movement at all was the march on Washington for jobs and freedom which I recall rightly was in '63, Spring of '63. And that was a real change event for me, it was the first time I had ever been involved in a demonstration and I wasn't an activist, at least not up to that time. But to be a part of that group in such an important event kind of turned my head around. And from then on I began to pay attention to what was happening in the Civil Rights Movement. That was uh, such an occasion along the Reflecting Pool there with those thousands and thousands of people and Martin Luther King's marvelous address which uh, I've kept a record of it uh, here. I've a phonograph record that every now and then when somebody wants something for a Civil Rights Memorial occasion I uh, I get out that record because uh, it was such a momentous speech. And Joan Baez singing and so many other people singing. Every time I see Joan, see Joan Baez I remind her of that and uh, what an important occasion that was for so many of us.