Interview with Rev. Orloff Miller
QUESTION 6
INTERVIEWER:

UM, GIVE ME A SENSE OF WHAT YOU ENCOUNTERED ONCE YOU GOT THERE, TALKING ABOUT THE PEOPLE,

Rev. Orloff Miller:

we were met at the airport in Montgomery by the people from the Selma, they knew that there would be some response to that telegram that Martin Luther King had sent. And uh, they sent cars, they sent uh trucks, uh, I remember riding in a car to Selma a truck in front of us, an open flatbed truck with a lot of ministers sitting on the flatbed, uh, going onto Selma. And, uh it had a flat tire and we stopped and there was a lot of concern about uh, being stopped on this road between Montgomery and Selma, and whether we were in danger or not. And the reassuring words of the drivers who had come for us, uh, but you could see that they were looking around anxiously at the same time. And uh, we arrived in Selma safely, obviously, we got into what was eventually called the compound, the George Washington Carver Housing Project which surrounds Brown Chapel, Brown's Chapel. And uh, folks were just so warm in their greeting of us, they were pleased that we had come, and grateful that uh, we had heard this, this plea for us to be a part of their struggle. And I remember eating at Brown's Chapel, we thought that, well, we really have no business taking from, from what food they may have, but they insisted on it, they wanted us very much to, to be a part of their lives and it was wonderful to do that. Uh, there was a never ending supply of food coming into that chapel for people around the housing project there. Eventually I stayed in one of the homes there, of Lonsy West and his family, and, uh, oh it was, we were made part of the family, part of the community.