Interview with Rev. Orloff Miller
QUESTION 8
INTERVIEWER:

CAN I ASK YOU TO START AGAIN, WE HAVE SOME LOUD NOISE . [unintelligible].

Rev. Orloff Miller:

OK… the churches were very deeply divided over the Civil Rights struggle, South and North, but especially in the South. And I remember when we went to Mississippi in January of '65 and visited a few of the little rural Universalist Churches, they did not want us there, they were very unhappy about our presence. The Birmingham Unitarian church which eventually had to uh, host the whole Unitarian Universalist Association's Board of Trustees uh, following uh, James Reeb's death, uh, they were very divided about the Unitarian Universalist involvement in the Selma fracas. As far as other denominations were concerned, many of the churches were still very segregated, uh, well, to this day there still exists what then was called, the African Methodist Episcopal Church, Brown's Chapel was a part of that denomination it's now called I believe, the American Methodist Episcopal Church. But um, the call that went out from Dr. King went to clergy, it didn't go to the denominations as such, and clergy I think felt freer to respond than lay people did. There were a lot of lay people who came to Selma, a lot of lay people, but they came from very divided congregations in many instances.