Interview with Leola Montgomery
QUESTION 2
INTERVIEWER:

AGAIN, IF YOU COULD TELL US IN YOUR OWN WORDS, WHAT TOPEKA WAS LIKE AT THIS TIME. IT WAS AN UNUSUAL PLACE FOR THIS KIND OF LAWSUIT. THERE WERE UM INTEGRATED SCHOOLS, CERTAIN INTEGRATED NEIGHBORHOODS, WHAT WAS IT LIKE?

Leola Montgomery:

There were integrated neighborhoods, and integrated schools but uh… There were integrated schools, and integrated neighborhoods, but yet it was a very segregated city. The uh, we had the blacks There were integrated schools, integrated neighborhoods, but uh, there still was a lot of segregation in Topeka. The blacks had their own places to go, the whites had their own places to go. So in one respect, we really weren't integrated, as we should have been. But there was integration in the junior high school, and the high school, and had been all during the time. But it was just at the elementary level that uh, they were not integrated. And, of course, we had quality schools, but then, uh, it wasn't a matter of being a quality school, it was a matter of having to go so far, to school, when there was a school in our neighborhood, four blocks away.