Interview with Walter Mondale
QUESTION 22
INTERVIEWER:

SORRY, I'M GOING TO ASK YOU TO SAY HIS NAME.

Walter Mondale:

No, Hubert never talked to me… nor would he talk to me that way. You know, he had a long record, Humphrey did, of civil rights – probably the best civil rights advocate of his generation, the pioneer. And I was very much of that same mold, and spent my life in civil rights. So we didn't there was no talk ever, no suggestion that, that what we were doing here could compromise that fundamental principle. And as a matter of fact, I think history is going to feel… deal very kindly with what we did there, because it was in effect, the civil rights act for the Democratic party, an act that the Republicans have yet to adopt uh, these many years later. From then on out uh, at every convention uh, the uh, people that were discriminated against, if they were, could make that a legal grounds of challenge. And in fact, if you look at uh, national Democratic delegations from the South and elsewhere now – since that convention uh, they are now fully integrated delegations. So it was a very very profound change in the Democratic party that took place in the rules adopted at the '64 convention, and I'm proud of it.