Interview with Walter Mondale
QUESTION 46
INTERVIEWER:

DO YOU THINK THEY WERE NAÏVE IN, IN, ON EITHER SIDE OR, OR, UNFAMILIAR WITH THE PROCESSES THAT THEY, THAT THEY SAW ONLY …

Walter Mondale:

Yes, yes, I think the delegation that made up the white uh, delegation, was used to segregation, and wanted to live with it. That was unacceptable. I think many of the, of the, who made up the black delegation were, were, were not familiar with the Democratic party, were not thinking in terms of this long-term integration effort, but, but sought a remedy right then and there which would seat them and make them the official Democratic party. Uh, I think either remedy would have produced long-term difficulties that we were able to avoid. You look at Mississippi today uh, it's been a, in my opinion, a miracle. Uh, the uh, recent Governor of Mississippi was one of the strong supporters of civil rights. Uh, Aaron Henry was the national committeeman, and when Clark ran for Congress, the black congressman, a candidate for Congress, the white leadership went in there and campaigned for him. I mean that, that happened, I believe, in part, because we insisted on the process of integration and not—did not put ourselves in the position of being forced to choose between a white delegation or a black delegation. I think that's, it was tough, but I think the long-term health of the party and the cause of, of uh, desegregation, benefited.