Interview with Amzie Moore
QUESTION 8
ARNDT:

…ABOUT THE FACT THAT HE HAD TALKED TO YOU AND YOU HAD SAID YHAT THERE WAS A WHOLE UH, NETWORK OF BLACK . .

Amzie Moore:

Let me say uh, I never had a complex…I knew Bob was a graduate from Harvard and had taught in a Jewish school in New York, and I was aware of the fact that uh, I didn't know what I thought I should have known. But I think Bob's approach to me was entirely different from what I thought his approach would have been, coming from Harvard, you know? And then I wasn't sure that I was able to explain what I thought I knew. But then it appeared that Bob believed me and was willing to work with me, and then I found out for the first time what education really is, I didn't know. Uh, I, I felt like that if, if a man was educated there wasn't very much you could tell him. Oh, I didn't think you could give him any advice, you know. Uh, uh, this had been the case in the South you know, but . . . . . . you know. To be honest with you, he was altogether different. And when I found out he was honestly seeking to help, then in any way I could, I was willing to help. But I think that was the, the relationship between Bob Moses and Amzie Moore. Uh, always made things comfortable for him, you know. We had what they…we had to eat, and uh… then when I found out Bob had been to Africa, you know, then I knew he's sincere. See, I automatically knew he was sincere if he'd been to Africa [laughter], because you know, it, it was just a thing in me that made me know that Africans had been exploited, and uh, you know [beep, tone] …a lot of things that they had not received they should have received. And I'd been around the world uh, I had looked at India, Africa, and found out that what I thought I was looking at over there was a dying civilization, which was probably the first of its kind in the world. And what I, what I really saw Bob…was that he had received an education to help people, rather than have people help him [laughter]. I, I just got that, that idea. And uh, he'd been to Africa, he'd worked with the Jewish, Jewish people, uh, he, he wasn't a jiver [laughter]. He was just a straightforward man. Uh, well I did what I could, it wasn't much, I had, my education was limited and I figured - well, I couldn't tell anybody anything they already didn't know. But I, then I later learned that there were experiences that a lot of people hadn't had that I'd had, and I would share those experiences with those people, if it would be helpful. And I learned to, to respect Bob, you know, and I felt like if I could do anything to help, then it should be my time to do it now if I was going to do it at all, period.