Interview with Robert Moses
QUESTION 17
INTERVIEWER:

MARK. IN '63—WHAT DID THE OUTCOME OF THE FREEDOM VOTE SAY ABOUT MISSISSIPPIAN DESIRE TO TAKE PART IN THE POLITCAL PROCESS?

Robert Moses:

The, the Freedom Vote that we held in 1963 was a continuation of a tactic that began in 1960, when we ran Reverend Smith for congress in the fourth congressional district, even though he didn't have a chance of winning. But we used it one, as an organizing tool and two, as a way to raise consciousness of people, that is eventually people were going to be electing people to office—black people to office, but it wasn't a thought in their mind at that time so, what you had to do was to begin to prepare them. Use the voter registration drive as a way of preparing them for what was coming next, which was the actual election of people to these offices. And to expand their consciousness so that they could begin to think that someday a black person would run for governor of Mississippi, for Lieutenant Governor of Mississippi. That they would be responsible for putting state together. And that's what we did with the Freedom Vote and I think it helped.

INTERVIEWER:

STOP. CAMERA ROLL 407.

Robert Moses:

...which involves Aaron Henry and Ed King and they want the students you know, and Lowenstein has, has sold them on the students…