Interview with Robert Moses
QUESTION 25
INTERVIEWER:

SO, FOR THOSE PEOPLE WHO DON'T KNOW VERY MUCH ABOUT THIS WHOLE PROJECT. HOW, TELL ME MORE ABOUT IT, MORE CONCRETE IN TERMS OF…

Robert Moses:

All right, I remember one thing that changed Jim Forman's mind about the summer project was the response that he began to get in the friends of SNCC offices to the summer project, in the sense that a lot of support was flowing into the offices around the students. That is not only were the students coming down but they were beginning to mobilize and to help mobilize around the country a support effort. One in terms of medical support, we had a whole organization of doctors who came down to Mississippi. Alvin Poussaint, headed up that service. Doctors began to explore all the medical conditions in Mississippi. Open clinics—built health stations. Work that has continued till this day. The lawyers—around the effort on the summer project they organized groups of lawyers. Even I think LCDC lawyers for a constitutional defense committee, I think it was called, was organized. Lawyers from all over the country came down and began to work on the segregation statutes of Mississippi, and began to file suits opening up various restaurants, all the public accommodations in Mississippi under the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Church people. Bob Spike with the National Council of Churches had organized the Mississippi Delta project and they began to send down church people, some of whom are there to this day, who took part in community organizing and took part in the summer project. The Free Southern Theater. Gil Moses and John O'Neal organized the Free Southern Theater, right there in Mississippi in the context of the Mississippi summer project. Then they later moved it to New Orleans because it was too much action in Mississippi. So there was a lot of activity which got generated. It was the—summer project sort of served as a catalyst for a lot of things that later on took effect.