Interview with Robert Moses
QUESTION 30
INTERVIEWER:

WHY FORM AT THAT TIME, AN INDEPENDENT PARTY, WHICH WAS AT THAT TIME—WHY TAKE A CHALLENGE TO THE NATIONAL CONVENTION? THERE IS THE IDEA OF FAIR REPRESENTATION, BUT WERE LEADERSHIPS SOMETHING MORE THAN THAT IN TERMS OF THE NEXT, A STRATEGIC MOVE HERE IN TERMS OF...

Robert Moses:

Well, we had been doing voter registration and clearly in doing voter registration we were confronted with the question, well, where does all this lead? OK, eventually you get the right to vote. What next, right? The other thing we were confronted with was while we were doing voter registration, we had so to speak the field to our self, because people could not just come in and organize politically. There wasn't any space to organize. I mean to organize you had to take life-threatening risks. Now very few people were willing to do that. So, while we were in the voter registration phase of this, we had space then to create some kind of political organization which we felt would be responsible to the people that we were working for. So, we moved from voter registration to political organizing sort of as a natural sequence right, but also to take advantage of the fact that for a short while, we had clear run. We had actual access to the people that other people were not willing to do the game because of the risks involved. And so we did that with the MFDP. As an attempt within the Democratic Party to actually gain credence in the Democratic party as the legal and rightful representation in Mississippi...Aaron Henry and Ed King and Andy Young to tell them what the deal is, and ask them to accept it. And then we find out about that meeting and insist that Mrs. Hamer and myself go. So we go…