Interview with Robert Moses
QUESTION 37
INTERVIEWER:

[unintelligible] I HAVE A PICTURE OF A FILM BEFORE THE CONVENTIONS. CUT FOR A SECOND.

Robert Moses:

So, that's Fannie Lou Hamer?

INTERVIEWER:

YES, THAT'S FANNIE LOU HAMER.

Robert Moses:

And...

INTERVIEWER:

YOU'RE STANDING NEXT TO HER ON THE FLOOR AT THE CONVENTION, AND SHE HAS—THE SEARGENT OF ARMS HAS STOPPED HER AND SAID, AND ASKED HER WHAT SHE WANTS, AND A NEWSMAN IS INTERVIEWING HER. SHE SAID, I WANT, MY NAME IS FANNIE HAMER AND I WANT TO SIT WHERE I'M GOING IN THE STATE OF MISSISSIPPI. AND SHE STANDING OVER WITH MRS. GRAY—

Robert Moses:

All right. What we liked about Mrs. Hamer was that she spoke from her heart. And she spoke about what was real to her from all of her experience. And even when she was thrown into the spotlight as a media person, she had matured enough so that she didn't change. She always spoke the same way, when she spoke at a small meeting in Mississippi, talking to people about what they had to do to get up and go register or anything. When she spoke at Atlantic city in front of national TV, she spoke the same way. And what came through always was her soul. I mean what you felt when she spoke and when she sang was someone who was opening up her soul and really telling you what she felt, and the pain that she had felt and the life that she had lived. And somehow she was able to convey to that, the people, in a way in which we couldn't, and I think one of the most beautiful things about the movement in Mississippi was that it was such that it enable the person like Mrs. Hamer to emerge.