Interview with Robert Moses
QUESTION 38
INTERVIEWER:

NOW AT THE END OF THAT CONVENTION, ESPECIALLY THAT MEETING ON SUNDAY, THE MISSISSIPPI DELEGATION WERE CALLED SHARECROPPERS, SAID THEY WERE—I MEAN PEOPLE ACTUALLY GOT UP AND SAID THESE THINGS TO THEM BECAUSE THEY WERE NOT WILLING TO TAKE THIS COMPROMISE. DID THAT, HOW DID THAT, DID THAT ANGER YOU? WHAT DID YOU FEEL WHEN THESE KINDS OF THINGS WERE GOING ON, THIS KIND OF—

Robert Moses:

Well, I mean there were sharecroppers. And if you think of knowledge in terms of book knowledge, they were ignorant. They hadn't been through the schools. They hadn't been processed. That was the thing about that delegation, about a large number of them, they weren't processed. There wasn't any of the legitimate institutions that this country recognized that they had been filed through and passed through and processed through, and so these were people who were bringing with them just their ordinary life experiences. They weren't ignorant about that, and they weren't ignorant about the relationship of those experiences to the larger political processes which were oppressing them. But what was tragic was that the Democratic Party was not able to take these people who were not processed in ways in which they expected people to be processed.