Interview with Constance Baker Motley
QUESTION 56
INTERVIEWER:

WE NEED YOU TO TALK FOR US A LITTLE BIT ABOUT THE WAYS IN WHICH THE COUNTRY WAS CHANGING AT TBAT TIME, UH, THE FACTORS THAT WERE MAKING THE CIIMATE CHANGE SO THAT WE COULD HAVE THE BROWN CASE.

Judge Constance Baker Motley:

Well, I think after World War II, as a result of the activity of black servicemen, really, the whole attitude in the country about the race relations problem uh, changed. I think people became more aware that something had to be done about the fact that black servicemen were overseas dying for this country, and when they would be coming home, they would be coming home to a situation that said, in effect, you're a second class citizen. You can't go to school with white children, or your children can't. You can't stay in a hotel or a restaurant because you're black. And I think that gave the momentum, uh, in particularly in the black community uh, for the, what became the Civil Rights Movement of the ‘5Os and ‘60s.