Interview with Herbert Muhammad
QUESTION 18
SAM POLLARD:

OK, so, ah, this is the wrap up, this is the, this is the last one. I just want you to tell me again the kind of reaction he was getting when he made his anti-war statements, ah, the kind of calls he was getting, people you know, coming to his house and stuff like that.

HERBERT MUHAMMAD:

Yes, well, Muhammad Ali, when he made his statement that he would not have anything to do with the Vietnam War, that, ah, he began to get a lot of statements from different, people in the White community, especially White community, they would throw rocks at his house, they'd shoot his house at night, they would give, they would call him all times of day and night, because they, they, they was very hurt themselves because they, some of their family members or their socially loved ones had been killed in, in the war, and they didn't feel, "Why did Muhammad Ali can make this kind of money an- and of the people in the United States and he don't go to war," you know, and then so they would, ah, threaten him, ah, shoot, shoot at his house, do all these kind of things. On the street they would spit on him, spit at him or something, call him out of his name, they'd do a lot of bad things. And, ah, this didn't effect Ali in no way, ah, and, ah, against the peoples, because he know that there was some people that had that kind of men- mentality.

SAM POLLARD:

Great, thank you, cut.