Interview with Diane Nash
QUESTION 10
INTERVIEWER:

WHAT I WANT YOU TO DO IS GET BACK TO BEING IN THE DORM, AND HEARING THAT ORANGEBURG, AND OTHER PLACES ARE STARTING TO MOVE. WHAT THAT MEANT TO YOU IN TERMS OF—

Diane Nash:

It was a total surprise, when other cities joined in the same chains that we were sitting-in. And I can remember being in the dorm any number of times and hearing the newscasts, that Orangeburg had demonstrations, or Knoxville or, you know, other, other towns. And we were really excited. I can remember, we'd applaud, and say yeah. When you are that age, you don't feel powerful. I remember realizing that with what we were doing, trying to abolish segregation, we were coming up against governors of seven states, judges, politicians, businessmen, and I remember thinking, I'm only twenty-two years old, what do I know, what am I doing? And I felt very vulnerable. So when we felt, when we heard these newscasts, that other cities had demonstrations, it really helped. Because there were more of us. And it was very important. **