Interview with Diane Nash
QUESTION 11
INTERVIEWER:

NOW, IT'S TIME. YOU'RE GOING TO MOVE. YOU'RE GOING TO GO DOWN, AND GOING TO SIT IN. YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT'S GOING TO HAPPEN, YOU KNOW, WHAT'S GOING TO FACE YOU. WOULD YOU TALK ABOUT THAT, WHAT THAT FEELING IS ALL ABOUT.

Diane Nash:

People used to tickle me, talking about how brave I was, sitting in, and marching, and what have you, because I was so scared. All the time. It was like wall-to-wall terrified. I can remember sitting in class, many times, before demonstrations, and I knew, like, we were going to have a demonstration that afternoon. And the palms of hands would be so sweaty, and I would be so tense and tight inside. I was really afraid. The movement had a way of reaching inside me and bringing out things that I never knew were there, like courage, and love for people. It was a real experience, to be among a group of people who would put their bodies between you and danger. And to love people that you work with enough, that you would put yours between them and danger. ** I can't say that I've had a similar kind of experience since Nashville. And the friendships that were forged then, as a result of going through experiences like that, have remained really strong and vital and deep, to this day. There are people that, sometimes I don't see them over several years, but when I do see them, we are still very close.