Interview with Diane Nash
QUESTION 15
INTERVIEWER:

LET'S JUMP A LITTLE BIT FURTHER AND—HOW DID PEOPLE RESPOND TO [unintelligible] HOW DID IT AFFECT THE MOVEMENT AT THAT TIME?

Diane Nash:

Attorney Looby was a very, very respected man in the community. He had a reputation of defending people who didn't have enough money to adequately pay him, and of being a really decent human being. And quite by accident, the student central committee had a meeting scheduled for six AM that morning. And I remember I was up, getting dressed to go to the meeting, when I heard the explosion, although I didn't know what it was. I just heard this big boom, and by the time I got out of the dorm and went to the cafeteria and what have you, people had started talking about the fact of what had happened. So when we got to the meeting that morning, we were able to again, move very rapidly on what had just happened, and we decided to have the mass march, consisting of students from all of the schools, who were participating. And so we got back—it was interesting, too, the make-up of the central committee. There was a real continuum of students, those who tended to be more radical. By radical, I mean, going to the heart of the problem, a really progressive thing, the ones who were always ready to march. And then there was, you know there was a continuum of people, those who were in the middle, and then those who were conservative, in terms of, you know, wanting to go slow. I wasn't, personally, I wasn't sure that you know, this mass march, that fast, that day, was the thing to do, at that time. After that it was really clear that it was a wonderful strategy, and I'm glad that the student committee decided to do it, even though I wasn't ready to at the moment. But—