Interview with Diane Nash
QUESTION 2
INTERVIEWER:

YOU'RE FROM CHICAGO, WAS FROM CHICAGO. ROSA PARKS. TO GO TO LITTLE ROCK. TALK ABOUT THESE THINGS, AND HOW THEY MIGHT HAVE BEEN PART OF YOUR LIFE AS A YOUNG GIRL, SHAPING—

Diane Nash:

You know, I heard about the Little Rock story, on the radio. And Autherine Lucy. I remember the Emmett Till situation really keenly, in fact, even now I can, I have a good image of that picture that appeared in Jet magazine of him. And they made an impression. However, I had never traveled to the South at that time. And I didn't have an emotional relationship to segregation. I had—I understood the facts, and the stories, but there was not an emotional relationship. When I actually went south, and actually saw signs that said "white" and "colored" and I actually could not drink out of that water fountain, or go to that ladies' room, I had a real emotional reaction. ** I remember the first time it happened was at the Tennessee State Fair. And I had a date with this, this young man. And I started to go the ladies' room. And it said, "white and colored" and I really resented that. I was outraged. So, it, it had a really emotional effect.