Interview with Diane Nash
QUESTION 29
INTERVIEWER:

THIS WILL BE ROOM TONE WITH THE DIANE NASH INTERVIEW, STARTING NOW.

Diane Nash:

There were many thousands of people that marched that day. We marched silently, really. And the, the long line of students must have continued for many, many blocks. Or miles, maybe. And we marched to the mayor's office. We had sent telegrams ahead of time, telling him that as a result of the bombing, turning the Loobys' home into a state of violence, tension, violence in the city of Nashville, we felt like we needed to talk to the mayor. So we met him on the steps of City Hall, and confronted him with what his feelings as a man, were, as a person. I was particularly interested in that, as opposed to just his being a mayor. And I have a lot of respect for the way he responded. He didn't have to respond the way he did. He said, that he felt like it was wrong for citizens of Nashville to be discriminated against at the lunch counters, solely on the basis of the color of their skin. And, I think that was the turning point. ** The Nashville newspaper reported that, in the headlines, the next day, and it was one more step towards desegregating the lunch counters. And I think that day was very important. One of the things that we were able to do in the movement, which was one of the things that we were also, that we learned, also, from Gandhi's movement, was to turn the energy of violence, that was perpetrated against us, into advantage. And so if Attorney Looby's house was burned, that was used as a catalyst to draw many thousands of people to express their opposition to segregation.