Interview with Diane Nash
QUESTION 3
INTERVIEWER:

YOU'RE BEGINNING TO TAKE PART IN NONVIOLENT, DIRECT ACTION WORKSHOPS. AND YOU, YOU'RE JOINING OTHER STUDENTS TO DO THIS, AND YOU'RE TALKING ABOUT SITTING IN, AND ATTACKING LUNCH COUNTERS. TALK TO ME ABOUT THOSE STUDENTS, AND, AND YOU AS ONE OF THEM. WHY DID YOU FEEL THAT THIS WAS SOMETHING THAT YOU HAD TO DO?

Diane Nash:

Well, I had by then experienced the emotional reaction, and was really feeling stifled, and my goodness, I came to college to grow, and expand and here I am shut in. And in Chicago, I had had access, at least, to public accommodations, and lunch counters and what have you. So, my response was, who's trying to change it, change these things. And I recall talking to a number of people in the dormitories at school and on campus, and asking them if they knew any people who were trying to—to bring about some type of change. And I remember being, getting almost depressed, because I encountered what I thought was so much apathy. At first, I couldn't find anyone, and many of the students were saying, "Why are you concerned about that?" You know, they were not interested in trying to effect some kind of change, I thought, they certainly didn't seem to be. And then, I did talk to Paul Laprad, who told me about the non-violent workshops that Jim Lawson was conducting. They were taking place a couple of blocks off campus. And the reason that I said earlier that I thought the other students were apathetic was that after the movement got started, and there was something that they could do, i.e., sit at a lunch counter, march, take part, many of those same students, who were right there, going to jail, taking part in marches, and sit-ins, and what have you. It was that they didn't have a concept of what they really could do, so when they got one, they were on fire. They wanted to—a change.