Interview with Diane Nash
QUESTION 40
INTERVIEWER:

NOW, WHEN THE RIDERS ARE AMBUSHED IN MONTGOMERY, THE SECOND WAVE, WITH JOHN LEWIS, JIM—AND THESE PEOPLE. WHAT DID YOU FEEL ABOUT—DID YOU, DID YOU EXPECT THEM TO BE PROTECTED AT THAT POINT?

Diane Nash:

Well, I hoped they would be, of course. Everything was so uncertain. We never knew what the situation would be like ten minutes from the time that it was. During the Freedom Ride, in my job as coordinator, I found myself really—that was an intensely emotional time for me, because the people, some of the people I loved most, who were my closest friends, I was very well aware of them, of the fact that when I went to sleep at night some of them might not be alive the next night. And during that particular time I think I—I cried just every night, profusely. And I needed to, as an energy release. It was so much tension. It was like being at war. And we were very upset when they were attacked and injured, and I remember visiting them in the hospital, and there was so much concern over which of these injuries would be permanent. People really stood to be permanently injured for the rest of their lives.