Interview with Diane Nash
QUESTION 7
INTERVIEWER:

THAT WAS A CAMERA ROLL OUT ON 353. WE'RE GOING TO 354. IT'S FEBRUARY, AND YOU'RE INVOLVED IN FINALS, AND YOU FEEL LIKE YOU'RE GOING TO GET IT STARTED, ONCE YOU GET OUT OF—WHAT DOES [unintelligible]

Diane Nash:

You know, we had, after—during the workshops, we had begun what we called testing the lunch counters. We had actually sent teams of people into department store restaurants, to attempt to be served, and we had anticipated that we'd be refused, and we were. And we established the fact that we were not able to be served, and we asked to speak to the manager, and engaged him in a conversation about, why not, the fact that it really was immoral to discriminate against people because of their skin color. And then Christmas break had happened. And we had intended to start the demonstrations afterwards, and we hadn't really started up again. So when the students in Greensboro sat-in on February 1, we simply made plans to join their effort by sitting-in at the same chains that that they sat-in at. After we had started sitting-in, we were surprised and delighted to hear reports of other cities joining in the sit-ins. And I think we started feeling the power of the idea whose time had come. Before we did the things that we did, we had no inkling that the—the movement would become as widespread as it, as it was.