Interview with Fred Nauman
QUESTION 32
LOUIS MASSIAH:

Could you talk about a growing awareness of a racial divide between a predominantly Black community that had once been supportive to teachers that were predominantly White?

FRED NAUMAN:

Ah, I don't think that the, that we ever lost the support of the Black community, ah, I think we lost, ah, I think that, that an artificial battle was set up by some people who, who were taking the Civil Rights Movement and using it for personal power, personal aggrandizement. Ah, I think that, it can be, can be demonstrated clearly by, ah, just a year later there was an election for representation, union representation in New York City for the paraprofessionals almost all Black. They voted overwhelmingly for the UFT to represent them.

LOUIS MASSIAH:

Could you stay in the time period. That's OK, but go ahead.

FRED NAUMAN:

Ah, the, the people with whom the, the, split developed, were really a group of militant, ah, they, they were not the Martin Luther Kings of, of the, ah, of the Civil Rights Movement. Ah, they were closely to, closer to, ah, the, Stokely Carmichael, to Malcolm X, ah, and, and, in many cases to people who were just interested in personal aggrandizement. Ah, I don't think they, they were with the movement as much as many of us in, in the White community were.

LOUIS MASSIAH:

Cut.