Interview with Huey P. Newton
QUESTION 9
LOUIS MASSIAH:

You were talking before about community control within the Black community and also integration into larger institutions. Could you talk about how that, how you believed in that philosophy and how you saw the Panthers sort of implementing it?

HUEY NEWTON:

Well, short, well, a short time after I was, ah, impressed by the Muslims and disillusioned, after the, ah, assassination of Malcolm X. Ah, I was studying politics, ah, and I became interested in progressive labor and Socialist Workers Party. Ah, at that time it was, it was, ah, during the period of African liberation. Many, most of the African countries were liberated during the '60s from colonialism. And, ah, that, we felt that, ah, there was a need for, not a separate nation but, ah, control of our dispersed communities. And we wanted control of, ah, of the communities where we were most numerous and, ah, the institutions therein. And at the same time that we, ah, felt that we were due because of tax paying, we were due, ah, free access to, ah, an equal treatment in public, ah, ah, public facilities. And we thought everyone should be, have that, ah, kind of participation in, ah, public facilities.

LOUIS MASSIAH:

Let's cut.





LOUIS MASSIAH:

OK, again, the notion of community control in Black communities and also fighting for public access to public accommodations, how is that part of the Panther philosophy and how--?

HUEY NEWTON:

Ah, at the time there were many Black nationalist groups that were influenced by the, ah, African liberation movement. And, ah, we differed from the Black American National Movement, Nationalist Movement in that, ah, we thought that we wanted, ah, it wasn't a, it wasn't a, ah, our goal for segregation or integration really. We wanted, ah, control of the institutions in our community where we were most numerous. And at the same time that we, ah, thought that we would, we would, we would do public, ah, to access to public institutions on an equal basis. And we thought everyone should, ah, participate, be able to equally participate in public institution. Ah, I think that as I remember back, ah, I was influenced by the situation and the condition in China, ah, in the People's Republic of China where there was, ah, there were many, many minority groups. I think the Huns are the majority group. Ah, ah, all of the, in the areas, ah, of the minority, ah, ah, ethnic groups, ah, the Chinese, this, this ethnic minority controlled its community. Get that full access to the public facilities. So I thought that if it could there, it could work here.