Interview with John Nichols
QUESTION 2
INTERVIEWER:

When we talked on the phone you told me this was the last thing you expected was a riot on a Sunday morning twenty times before the same week--

JOHN NICHOLS:

It did because the Detroit riot of '67 didn't follow the classical pattern. Normally riots broke out on Saturday nights, on the afternoon shift, and usually it was some violent police action, usually as a result of a shooting, or a fight, or an arrest with, with complications. The raid on the Blind Pig was not an unusual thing in that particular area of the town as I, as I told you on the phone. It had happened twenty times the month before and twenty times the day afterwards.

INTERVIEWER:

I just wanted you--it was, it was a wonderful answer. I need to s--to deal with that --was the raid on the Blind Pig unusual?

JOHN NICHOLS:

The raid on the Blind Pig was not unusual at all. They were generally conducted without any, ah, any particular problems. Many of the times citizens who, knowing the area would go out and move among the crowds and help disperse them, but there had never been an instance where a major occurrence resulted, as a result of a ra--raid on the Blind Pig. This particular time there was more there than the clew--crew expected, it required shuttling several times from the station to the scene taking prisoners back and forth and the crowd become restive and what was kind of a mood hilarity grew into some derisive talk to the police and ultimately was stoning the cars** and, and the police commander then did what had worked in many, many instances before. He backed the police out of the area, which in some instances had, had served to enable the crowd to leave without any particular loss of face and they would mill around for a while and then go back home. This particular instance, the crowd just increased and increased and increased and the depredations began more heavily than before.

INTERVIEWER:

What--