Interview with Eleanor Holmes Norton
QUESTION 12
JACKIE SHEARER:

Well let me just read you this, and see if you feel, "As a Black woman who has been involved in many struggles for Civil Rights, what is your personal philosophy of struggle and moral authority?" Is there something you'd like to say?

ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON:

Yeah, OK.

ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON:

My chair too, or just my body.


JACKIE SHEARER:

As a Black woman who has been involved in many of the struggles for Civil Rights, what is your personal philosophy of struggle and moral authority?

ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON:

When, When the Civil Rights Movement is no longer needed, and we ask ourselves, "What did it mean?", it seems to me that the answer will mean that it meant something universal. It meant something beyond Chicago and Detroit and Mississippi, and if so, it meant that because of its impact on people who were not only Black but who were, ah, other things as well. We see the evidence on the women's movement, for example, was directly inspired by the Civil Rights example. Hispanics and American Indians understand about equality because of the Civil Rights example. And people all over the world took this as, as an example, and color discrimination in the United States, as well as in the rest of the world, is among the most despised kinds of discrimination in no small part because of the universalism of the Civil Rights Movement. Blacks get their moral authority not only because they were pressing for their own rights, but because they did so in a way that wrote equality lessons large. And they wrote those lessons large enough for people throughout this country and people throughout the world to understand the meaning of equality and our movement, it seems to me, is important, ah, far more for what it meant to millions of people all over the world than what it meant for twenty million Americans. Our own freedom is precious and important, but in the end, what gives our movement its majesty is the example it set throughout the world for people of color and for people who, in, in, in any way, were oppressed and found in that example a reason to hope and strive for a different life**.

JACKIE SHEARER:

Cut. That was wonderful, thank you.

ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON:

Oh, God. Is that it?

JACKIE SHEARER:

Nope, almost. Now I would to


JACKIE SHEARER:

Now, these are two questions for Judy's show, and the first on is on--


[TEAM B]