Interview with Eleanor Holmes Norton
QUESTION 4
JACKIE SHEARER:

Now, what was your feeling about the significance of the Bakke case? Was it merely symbolic? If it was symbolic, is that merely?

ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON:

The Bakke case, I felt, was the wrong case at the wrong place at the wrong time. It was an education case, it seemed to me quite inappropriate for law on affirmative action to be set by a education case, since most affirmative action in this country occurs in employment, and it occurs in employment as a matter of law, while the affirmative action that went on in the university was very often self-initiated by educators. Um, as it turns out, we won the Bakke case, Bakke got in to school, and I had no problem with that, but the standards that emerged from that case were fairly much confined to education and left the road open in a positive direction for the next case, the Weber case, that would indeed address employment discrimination and affirmative action.

JACKIE SHEARER:

Great. Cut. That was wonderful.

JACKIE SHEARER:

Cut. I'm sorry.

ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON:

I thought that was, I'm sure that that was, you know, miles too long.