Interview with Daisy Nunley
QUESTION 4
SHEILA C. BERNARD:

--you know, about how far you are, where you live in relationship to where the trouble is, so we can get a sense of how far you are. OK, so if you could tell me, it's, ah, it's Sunday, July 23rd.

DAISY NUNLEY:

OK. Ah, the, ah, very first hint that we had of any, ah, difficulty, was my sister-in-law called, ah, about 8:30 Sunday morning and, ah, she was concerned about her brother. My husband was working, ah, midnights, and, ah, she called and asked me, she said, "I heard that, ah, there's a riot on 12th Street, is there a riot?" And I said, "No, there's no riot, everything is quiet over here." And so she asked, she said, ah, "Has James got home?" And I said, "No, he hadn't got home yet." And shortly oh, maybe five or ten minutes later he came up and I asked him, I said, ah, "Daisy said that there's a, ah, riot on 12th, do you see anything? Did you hear anything?" He said, "No, there's, I didn't see anything, regular Sunday morning." So we sat on the front porch and just, it was a peaceful Sunday morning and then, ah, oh, about ten o'clock, I had the radio on and I heard them say that they had, ah, closed 12th at West Grand Boulevard, and, ah, that was all that they mentioned, they just said there was a little disturbance on 12th Street and they had closed it at, ah, West Grand Boulevard. And then maybe about noon I noticed that, ah, traffic in the street was picking up and you could see people moving towards 12th Street, ah, it was like people found out that something was going on. So the traffic did increase and as the, ah, maybe, ah, people got out of church, ah, traffic, ah, people started in that direction so, ah, that was when we knew that something was really happening there on 12th Street.

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

OK, stop. Your parents were visiting, were looking for a painter--



DAISY NUNLEY:

Ah, after church was over my mother came by and stopped by our house and, ah, her and my dad, they were going over to, ah, my brother's house to meet a painter, they were going to make arrangements for him to have his house painted. And I told her, I said, "I heard the, ah, they're having some trouble over on 12th Street." So she said, "Well, I have got to go." And I said, "Well, if I were you I wouldn't because it seems like, ah, they're having some difficulty." She said, "No, I'll go anyway." So about an hour later they both got back and they were kind of hot and bothered, ah, and I said, ah, "What's the matter?" And they said, "We couldn't get across 12th Street, they just, everything is blockaded up there." And, and she says, ah, "We're going to go home." And I said, "Well, that's fine, go straight on home." And by the time they got home I told them to call me to make sure because you could tell by this time, ah, something was going on, it was just in the air, that something was about to happen. The burning hadn't yet started, but that, just that excitement that something was going to happen, was in the air. So by the time they got home they called and they got r- right at, ah, Grand River and West Grand Boulevard, and there was a furniture store there and, ah, b- by the time they crossed Grand River on, got onto the other side, someone, the loo- the rioting started right there, they started looting the de- the store, and then they ignited it and someone sent a fire bomb off and they took out the whole block.

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

OK, stop. OK, now I want to, if you could explain--