Interview with William O'Neal
QUESTION 41
INTERVIEWER:

How do you think members of the Black community at that period would have perceived what you were doing?

WILLIAM O'NEAL:

Well, those members of the Black Panther Party, those members of the community that weren't informants, I'm sure that they wouldn't understand, but there was quite a few informants back then. Quite a few. I mean, what am I supposed to do? Feel guilty right now about it? I didn't feel guilty then, I was hurt because Fred Hampton died. I was hurt because a lot of other people died in the Panthers. There were a lot of Panthers that died in Chicago, got killed needlessly and senselessly. At this point I questioned the whole purpose of the Black Panther Party. It got a lot of people hurt, did, did very little else. I mean, if you associate the Black Panther Party with the Civil Rights Movement, that's, that's a mistake. In my, in my thinking, they were necessary. It was a shock treatment for White America to see Black men running around with guns just like Black men had saw White men running around with ru--guns. Yeah, that was a shock treatment. It was good in that extent. but it got a lot of black people hurt.**