Interview with Russell Oswald
QUESTION 24
SHEILA C. BERNARD:

If you could, in your book you describe that this feeling of unity, was a high point in the Attica thing, that people were working together and that you actually felt jubilant at that point. Is that an accurate?

RUSSELL OSWALD:

No, I, I, I felt, ah, after this work on the set of demands, that we were coming together a little better. But, ah, what I didn't realize was that there were dissidents who were not with the observers that we worked with when we worked out this, this agenda. Ah, there were many dissident people who were real troublesome and, and the sort of persons that I shouldn't have, ah, permitted to be on the Observer Committee in the beginning.

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

Can you give me more information. I'm not following what you're talking about.

RUSSELL OSWALD:

Well, I'm not going to name names. But there were a number of people on the Observer's Committee who were so partisan that they couldn't be observe, objective observers about anything. And they were just there to foment trouble. And those are the ones I'm talking about.