Interview with Rosemary Porter
QUESTION 22
SHEILA C. BERNARD:

Was the issue of Marquette Park sort of, the reaction against the marchers, was it racial and was it economic?

ROSEMARY PORTER:

Well, I think, you know, uh--

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

I'm sorry. I was talking.

ROSEMARY PORTER:

Oh, the issues of Marquette Park whether, whether it, it's racial or economics OK? I think everybody wants to think that it's racial, all right? That's the, that's the, the notion that somebody wants to put in everybody's heads that it's a big racial thing. When actually it's economics. It's economics. Your home is your single most, biggest investment. Your home and your neighborhood. And they got people so worried about if a Black moves in the neighborhood is gone. That thing was never, that idea was never, um, created by middle class White people or by Black people. I mean, it's just been the history that through panic peddling, and real estates that made thousands, millions, by Black after Black resegregation a neighborhood, you know, ah, a long time ago there was a theory, they could make a million dollars from every block they turned, every block they turned. They made the money. The White people didn't make money. The Black people didn't make money. The real estates made money and they do it because of that. They can move the Blacks into middle class White neighborhoods. They can move the Whites out of middle class neighborhoods into the suburbs. They make the money, we don't make anything. But they, they propagate the idea that because Blacks move into White neighborhoods, your house values are going to go down**. And that's the first thing those panic peddlers will tell you, "Get going while you can still get your money."

SHEILA C. BERNARD:

Cut please.