Interview with Rosemary Porter
QUESTION 5
SHEILA C. BERNARD:

So can you explain it in terms of the beginning of when the neighborhood began to change racially? "People started calling and you didn't know who was that" is that what happened?

ROSEMARY PORTER:

Well, that's right. Um, as the neighborhood began to racially change, I mean, that's, you'd just start getting all these phone calls and, ah, people knocking at your door, and, ah, sometimes they'd just hang up, sometimes they'd say, "You know, we're, we're looking for houses in the area. Are you interested in selling? We have buyers all lined up." Um, and it's, it's just like you, you get bombarded by it from every different angle. And when a neighborhood is really g- you know, changing, I mean, you just don't need that, that kind of aggravation. I mean, people who decided to leave are gonna leave. And those that are, they're concerned about leaving, they d- they don't ha- they don't deserve to be, ah, you know, harassed and, ah, and frightened because that's what, that's how you feel. You're scared. You get scared. B- it isn't going to stop. You can take your phone off of the hook at night time, wrap it up in a towel. You can do that every night. Then th- they start cal- coming to the door and knocking on the door.