Interview with Reverend John Powis
QUESTION 4
INTERVIEWER:

What was the feeling about the quality of education in Ocean Hill-Brownsville. You know, the overcrowding and other factors about the actual teaching, in, in that time?

JOHN POWIS:

It was bad and it was, it was, it was, it was chaotic, because you had so many teachers assigned to each school because they were on double session, they were teaching either the morning or the afternoon session, not both, and, uh, it was, it was constantly in a state of flux, and the, uh, the parents were almost desperate trying to figure out what to do with the education of their children. But it was, it was, it was a very bad scene.

INTERVIEWER:

Cut.



INTERVIEWER:

Once again, what was, what was, what was the feeling in Ocean Hill-Brownsville about the quality of education?

JOHN POWIS:

The schools in Ocean Hill-Brownsville, around 1964-65, were really, really very desperately bad. And, uh, with the kids only going four hours a day, and with doubles, double groups of teachers in each of the schools, the best word I could give for it at that time was that the schools were chaotic. They really were bad, and the, uh, and the parents knew it. And they knew it from the point of view of what results they were getting with kids going to high school.